How to Hunt Hogs in the Winter

Introduction

Wild hogs are normally nocturnal animals. Research shows that hogs have a habit of feeding just before the break of dawn and within an hour just before sunset. During the winter season and cold periods, the weather conditions make it difficult for vegetation to germinate nor insects to migrate. During this period, hogs are also in abundance making it a perfect time for hunting. I will take you through some tips on how to hunt hogs in the winter.

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Winter Hog Hunting Tips and Tricks   

What is the best time to hunt wild hogs? This is a question that many hunters ask. Well, the right time to hunt hogs is during breezy and cool days. This is during late winter or early spring. Here are some hog hunting tips and tricks that you should know.

Track Hogs with Trail Cameras

One great advantage of wild hogs is that they tend to follow patterns. This makes it easy to predict and monitor where they’d eat, where they would sleep, mate and simply understand their habitat. A trail camera that is night vision enabled would come in handy as this would effectively monitor their patterns.

It is recommended to install the trail camera in suspected areas where the hogs tend to root the ground for food. However, one should understand during winter hogs tend to slightly alter their habits to accommodate the lack of consistent, reliable food supply.

Photo Source – online

Monitor Water Sources & Food sources

Many hogs are very lazy naturally and this happens to be an advantage to the hunter.  This would contribute to predictable eating habits considering hogs are fond of eating. In most cases, hogs often congregate around water sources to quench their thirst. Corn would further attract the hogs more, therefore, throwing the corn around the water sources would definitely gather larger groups of swine. 

Use baits

Baits commonly used are usually foodstuff examples being shelled corn (dry or fermented), other grains, sweet potatoes or overripe fruits, commercial scents or attractants, molasses.  Hogs prefer eating corn off the ground instead of actually having to root the ground for food thus providing corn in huge amounts would have them easily and effectively attracted to the bait spot.

Spot and stalk

Wild hogs love to hang out in dense, brushy areas. But in the winter, most of the leaves are off the trees and it makes it harder for any swine to hide from you.  Lack of leaves makes it a lot easier, thus personally I would suggest a way to find them is to start walking and look for them.

A quality set of optics is essential for stalking hogs, binoculars are invaluable for planning your stalk as the hogs tend to shift and this could cause loss of sight them when creeping close.

Photo Source – online

Proper dressing attire

Harsh and unbearable weather conditions are expected especially during winter. This would, therefore, force one to observe heavy dressing. Hand gloves are essential not forgetting waterproof boots which are most ideal.

Having insulated boots is highly recommended for possibilities of stepping into pools of water, snow or mud. Boots insulated with Thinsulate, a type of synthetic insulation made by 3M, is so special for its durability and ability to trap more air in a tinier space due to its fine and small fibers.

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Final Words

Winter and other cold seasons are perfect for hunting hogs. To make your hunting successful, you need to know some tips and tricks. I hope with the above tips on how to hunt hogs in the winter will manage to bring your catch home.

Merrill Daley
 

Hi, my name is Merrill Daley, a Shooting expert & Part time blogger. My articles were featured on the industries biggest publications, because of the high quality of research. After shooting almost 5 years, I decided to start my own blog Scope Picks.

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